The Basics of the Christian faith

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  • Is there more to life than this? (previously Christianity: Boring, Untrue and Irrelevant?)
  • Who is Jesus?
  • Why did Jesus die?
  • How can we have faith?
  • Why and how do I pray?
  • Why and how should I read the Bible?
  • How does God guide us?
  • Who is the Holy Spirit?
  • What does the Holy Spirit do?
  • How can I be filled with the Holy Spirit?
  • How can I resist evil?
  • Why and how should I tell others?
  • Does God heal today?
  • What about the church?
  • How can I make the most of the rest of my Life?

Read more about the Alpha Course.

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Baptism

In the 1970s, the United Church reached an ecumenical agreement with the Presbyterian, Lutheran, Roman Catholic, and Anglican churches in Canada that baptisms within these churches are mutually recognized as valid. Further to that, the United Church recognizes the validity of any baptism by another denomination that was performed with water and in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.[1]

Atonement

Scriptures used in support of unlimited atonement
These are Scriptures commonly used by those who support Unlimited atonement:

  • John 1:29
  • John 3:14-18
  • 2 Corinthians 5:14-15
  • 1 Timothy 2:3-6
  • 1 Timothy 4:10
  • Titus 2:11
  • 2 Peter 2:1
  • 2 Peter 3:9
  • 1 John 2:2

Confession

Confession Bible Quotes
• James 5:16
• Acts 19:18
• Matthew 3:5-6
• Mark 1:5
• 1 Timothy 6:12
• 1 John 1:9
• Numbers 5:6-7
• Nehemiah 9:2
• Sirach 4:26

Grave sins must be confessed once per year.
Venial sins are “recommended” for confession.

CHAPTER III : THE PENITENT

Can. 987 In order that the faithful may receive the saving remedy of the sacrament of penance, they must be so disposed that, repudiating the sins they have committed and having the purpose of amending their lives, they turn back to God.

Can. 988 §1 The faithful are bound to confess, in kind and in number, all grave sins committed after baptism, of which after careful examination of conscience they are aware, which have not yet been directly pardoned by the keys of the Church, and which have not been confessed in an individual confession.

§2 The faithful are recommended to confess also venial sins.

Can. 989 All the faithful who have reached the age of discretion are bound faithfully to confess their grave sins at least once a year.

Can. 990 No one is forbidden to confess through an interpreter, provided however that abuse and scandal are avoided, and without prejudice to the provision of can. 983 §2.

Can. 991 All Christ’s faithful are free to confess their sins to lawfully approved confessors of their own choice, even to one of another rite.

“Catechism of the Catholic Church”. 2000.
Grave Sin
`CCC 2272
`CCC 2480
`CCC 2380
`CCC 2148
`CCC 2434
`CCC 2181
`CCC 2117
`CCC 2384
`CCC 2385
`CCC 2386
`CCC 2290
`CCC 2291
`CCC 2539
`CCC 2277
`CCC 2302
`CCC 2152
`CCC 2476
`CCC 2353
`CCC 2303
`CCC 2357
`CCC 2388
`CCC 2482
`CCC 2352
`CCC 2268
`CCC 2163
`CCC 2354
`CCC 2355
`CCC 2356
`CCC 2439
`CCC 2120
`CCC 2284
`CCC 2281
`CCC 2297
`CCC 2413
`CCC 2434
`CCC 2268
`CCC 2400
`CCC 2434

Venial Sin
`CCC 1863

Penance
`CCC 1422

The Gravity of Sin: Mortal and Venial
`CCC 1854-1864

Sacramentality

A sacramental outlook invites Catholic educators to develop and nurture their own sacramental consciousness. When Catholic educators live their own lives in appreciation of the goodness of creation and as meaningful and worthwhile, their attitude permeates their interaction in the educational milieu and will encourage a similar outlook in others. The ideal of a Catholic school is to educate its members into a world that is sacred and holy because it is God’s creation. Appreciation for God’s gift finds expression in the attitudes and actions of a school community through liturgy and stewardship. School policies and practices include reverence for the sacredness of created things through environmentally respectful actions that regard creation as the Lord’s and for the enhancement of the life of all people.

Strategies to Develop a Sacramental Awareness in Catholic Schools

  • create attractive learning environments
  • attend to the sacred dimension in all subject areas
  • celebrate key moments in the life of the community
  • provide opportunities to participate in the sacramental and liturgical life of the church
  • include sacramental awareness programs in faith and professional development activities
  • keep a clean and healthy environment for learning
  • promote environmental awareness programs
  • celebrate the gifts of creation, Earth Day
  • participate in recycling programs
  • encourage responsible stewardship of resources

How does Catholic education express the sacramentality of all creation?

Humanness

In partnership with the entire community, the Catholic school has a value and importance that are fundamental to the integral human formation of children. In virtue of its mission, the Catholic school constantly and carefully attends to the cultivation in children of the intellectual, creative and aesthetic gifts of the human person. Catholic schools foster in children an appreciation of their God-given dignity; the ability to make correct use of their judgement, will and affectivity; promote in them a sense of values; encourage just attitudes and prudent behaviour; introduce to them the cultural heritage handed down from past generations; prepare them for professional life; and encourage the friendly interchange of diverse cultures and backgrounds that will lead to mutual understanding.

In short, Catholic schools contribute to integral human formation. Catholic schools strive to form strong and responsible persons who are capable of making free and correct choices and are able to form in themselves a clear idea of the meaning of life.

Strategies to develop the Human Dimension of Catholic Schools:

  • Give appropriate emphasis to academic excellence
  • Support art, music, drama, dance and other fine arts and performing arts
  • Create a healthy respect for physical education and manual arts
  • Recognize the importance of fun and humour
  • Exercise forgiveness and reconciliation
  • Create discipline policies that are firm, fair, and flexible and that respect the dignity of persons and invite forgiveness and reconciliation

How does Catholic education respect the dignity of human persons?

Tradition

The fundamental source of human knowledge is encounter with the world and its history through experience. The guiding intent for the curriculum is to educate people to become fully alive and free human beings. In a Catholic context this source and this guiding intent both point to the experience of the community, an experience where Jesus Christ is encountered and the values of the Reign of God direct human action and being. Simply put, we learn through life.

Catholic education brings a focus to learning to discover, evaluate, interpret the human experience, which is always in transition, in ways that enhance and deepen appreciation for the gift of creation and provide insight into how learning can lead to fullness and freedom for all people.

Strategies to develop a respect for the life-giving dimensions of tradition:

  • Provide access to the tradition of human culture–works of art, literature, etc.–as a way of engaging learners in conversation with the past
  • Invite learners to bring the symbols and artifacts of tradition into their own lives with a questioning and interpreting attitude
  • Invite learners to come to know for themselves the wisdom, knowledge, or beauty, of the tradition
  • Allow for the occasion for moral discourse and provide access to models of responding to the moral questions raised by the study of the past
  • Invite learners into a critical assessment of experience so they may discern what is life-giving and life-enhancing
  • Celebrate the hope that comes with recognizing God’s continuing action in the life of the community

How can tradition be life-giving in Catholic education?

Community

The fundamental task of Catholic schools is the integration of faith and culture and the integration of faith and life. The task is reached by integrating all the different aspects of human knowledge and in the growth of the virtues characteristic of Christians. Through this integration, the Catholic school models the kind of community that forms students to be citizens who care for the common good and and people of faith committed to the reign of God in the world. Catholic schools contribute to the common good of society.

Strategies to develop the Community Dimension of Catholic Schools:

  • Invite reflection on the mission statement of the school and/or school jurisdiction
  • Encourage committees that will animate the life of the school
  • Celebrate the unity within the diversity of the school population
  • Celebrate and participate in societal and community events and church sponsored initiatives such as Family Day, United Nations Day, Ecumenism
  • Foster social consciousness by addressing social ills through events such as Share Lent, Elimination of Racism Day
  • Integrate community service programs and projects into the life of the school
  • Hold induction ceremonies for new staff, students, parents, welcoming them into the community
  • Communicate to school community members about the life of the school

What does the community dimension mean for a Catholic school community?

Christian Unity

1 Corinthians 1:10

Prayer: God, indivisible Trinity of Love, you created us in your image. May husbands and wives unite and raise children in your loving way. We ask that all families find inspiration in the Holy Family of Nazareth and pass along to their children humane and Christian values, establishing a strong foundation for a more loving society. (Adapted from the prayer for the 6th World Meeting of Families).

Reflection Question: How can you work in unity with other Christians to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ?

Discussion Questions: Our Catholic schools are committed to many Social Justice causes, regardless of Faith, discuss past and perhaps a future project the school could undertake for others in need.