Glory Road Essay Question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

After viewing the film Glory Road write a 5 paragraph essay response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

Pick and choose from the following six ideas to develop your own thesis and topic sentences. In your essay refer to specific detail from the film, your own experiences, and passages from Scripture to develop your response to the question: What Does It Take to Change the World?

One: Recruiting Strategies
(read Luke 14:15-24; 1 Corinthians 1:24-31; and John 3:16-18; John 1:12-13)

  • How does Coach Haskins change his recruiting methods after the traditional methods fail?
    In school, when a team “captain” was choosing up sides for a team — what determined if someone got picked or not?
  • Have you ever wanted to be part of something — knowing you could do well — only to be rejected? Or have you ever rejected someone because of their race, the way they talked, the clothes they wore, or where they lived? Describe your experience.
  • When Paul comments about “the wise” who do you think he is talking about? Who would represent the “wise” in Glory Road?
  • What kind of people does God “recruit?”
  • What does God use as His standard for who makes the team?

Two: Good Players Need Good Coaching
(read 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; 2 Timothy 2:2-7)

  • Name some of the behaviors that players on the Texas Western team had to overcome in order to become winners.
  • What kinds of things did Coach Haskins do to discipline his team so that they would work together?
  • What does the Bible say about why some people might not work well together?
  • Name some roles Christians play in changing the world for Christ.
  • Describe a coaching or mentoring relationship you have or had in school. What effect did the coaching have on your performance? What characteristics did you most appreciate in the person who was helping you?
  • What does Timothy — and the rest of us — learn about playing on God’s team from each of the examples that Paul uses?
  • Where should we go to find out what we should do, what the rules are, and how to work hard?
  • Once we have learned how to change the world for Christ, what does Paul say we should do with that knowledge?

Three: Great Players Persevere
(read 1 Peter 5:8; 1 Peter 4:12-19; James 1:2-3, 12 and Romans 5:1-5)

  • What were some of the responses people had when the Texas Western team began to win — especially when they began to beat highly-ranked teams?
  • Once things got really bad, what happened to the team?
  • How was their internal conflict demonstrated outwardly?
  • Who is one of our opponents?
  • Why shouldn’t we be surprised that we face opposition?
  • What does it mean to be reviled?
  • What do James and Paul say we should do in the face of difficult opposition?
  • What is the end result of endurance and perseverance?

Four: Players Don’t Stand Alone
(read Romans 12:4-13, Philippians 2:1-11 and Hebrews 10:23-25)

  • When Coach Haskins announces his decision to his team — what is their response?
  • Some of the white players would never again get a chance to play in a championship tournament, so why do you think they agreed to sit out the game?
  • What lines of support did you see develop that helped Texas Western to prevail? According to the Bible, what are some ways we can show support for one another?
  • How does meeting together regularly contribute to the support of all members?

Five: All Players Triumph through Belief and Action
(read James 2:14-26)

  • What obstacles have you overcome in your life?
  • Can you give some examples of how action confirms belief?
  • What kind of actions can you take that will lead others to Jesus and help to change the world for Christ

Six: Go Play to Win!
(read 1 Corinthians 9:25-27)

  • What one thing will you change about yourself this week to help win the world for Christ?
  • What one thing will you commit yourself to do for someone else in this room to help them in their faith
  • Discuss what you can do to reach out to others and help them to join God’s team.

NRSV translation of the related Scriptures from http://bible.oremus.org/:
James 2:1-10
Luke 14:15-24
1 Corinthians 1:24-31
John 3:16-18
John 1:12-13
1 Corinthians 12:12-27
2 Timothy 2:2-7
1 Peter 5:8
1 Peter 4:12-19
James 1:2-3
James 1:12
Romans 5:1-5
Romans 12:4-13
Philippians 2:1-11
Hebrews 10:23-25
James 2:14-26
1 Corinthians 9:25-27

Studying God’s Finished Picture

Imagine spending 5 minutes trying to complete a 200+ piece jigsaw puzzle WITHOUT looking at the picture.

Now imagine looking at the picture and seeing how many pieces you can add in the next 5 minutes.

In what ways is putting the puzzle together like or unlike putting your life together?

In what ways is the puzzle like or unlike answering the question, “Who Am I?”

Choose one of the following passages to study:

  • read the passage
  • write about what you think the passage says
  • explain what you think the passage means in each of your lives today
  • describe what the passage says we are in God’s eyes

Passages:

  • Genesis 1:26-31
  • Isaiah 43:1-3
  • Colossians 3:5-17
  • Luke 4:18-19
  • Ephesians 5:15-16
  • John 6:21-40
  • 1 Thessalonians 4:3-5
  • Ephesians 4:1-32
  • Galatians 5:13-26
  • Psalm 139:1-24
  • John 14:12

What Does God Think About Us?

Read 2Corinthians 5:17-18 and Jeremiah 1:4-8.

As we try to answer the question “Who Am I?” we need to know what God wants for us. What does he think about us?

We also need to look at ourselves – our interests, abilities, weaknesses.

As we go about answering this question we also need to talk with other people. Hearing about our strengths and weaknesses from others often tells us things about ourselves that we overlook.

Leave several comments on your classmates’ blogs. Write about the qualities you appreciate in that person. Everything you write should be positive – no jokes or putdowns.

D’Souza versus Hitchens

from Thousands attend Boulder debate on atheism and religion

Father Kevin Augustyn, pastor of St. Thomas Aquinas Parish, prefaced the debate, saying, “As Catholics, we are not afraid of intellectual debate. Faith and reason are not opposed to each other.”

Modern science, he[D’Souza] said, was “faith-based” in that it was rooted in Christian assumptions. We presume that we live in a lawful, rational universe whose external rationality is mirrored in our own minds, presumptions nourished by Christianity.

Man is placed between two distinct domains of “the way we are” and “the way we ought to behave.” – D’Souza

If atheism were correct, Hitchens argued, “we would be in precisely the same place we are now” in considering what our duties are towards others and why we are here.

Hitchens then raised the raised the questions of why Christianity should be considered superior to other religions, such as Islam.

D’Souza replied by noting the disconnect between “the way things are” and “the way they ought to be.” This can be explained by supposing a chasm between the “human level” of existence and the “divine level.” In D’Souza’s view, Islam and Judaism hold that this chasm may be closed by mankind building a “ladder” to climb to God.

Christianity, however, declares this project “wonderful but impossible” by teaching that the chasm “has to be closed from the other side” through God entering the world in the person of Jesus Christ.

Hitchens then explained that he finds it “extraordinarily objectionable” to exclude the “occupant of the womb” from the human family.

Following the debate, CNA spoke with Father Augustyn. He said it was an “excellent debate” with both speakers doing “very well” on their positions. In his view, D’Souza countered and “unmasked” some of Hitchens’ “unfair” and “selective” comparisons of religions.

“At the same time, Christopher Hitchens is a formidable opponent. He’s very witty, very sharp, he makes good points, and he brings out audience participation. I don’t think his arguments hold water, but I think he is a good debater.”

from Philosophy for Dummies

from Philosophy for Dummies

  1. The existence of something is intelligible only if it has an explanation.
  2. The existence of the universe is thus either:
    1. unintelligible or
    2. has an explanation
  3. No rational person should accept premise (2.1) by definition of rationality
  4. A rational person should accept (2.2), that the universe has some explanation for its being.
  5. There are only three kinds of explanations:
    1. Scientific: physical conditions plus relevant laws yield the Event explained.
    2. Personal: Explanations that cite desires, beliefs, powers and intentions of some personal agent.
    3. Essential: The essence of the thing to be explained necessitates its existence or qualities (for example, if you ask why a triangle has 3 sides, I would respond that it is the essence and necessity for a triangle to have 3 sides by its definition.
  6. The explanation for the existence of the whole universe can’t be scientific because there can’t be initial physical conditions and laws independent of what is to be explained. Even the Big Bang theory fails to explain the existence of the universe because modern science cannot explain where the original Big Bang singularity came from. The universe as a sum total of all natural conditions and laws cannot be explained unless we have an Archimidean reference point outside the system.
  7. The explanation for the existence of the universe can’t be essential because the universe cannot exist necessarily. This is because, it could have been possible for the universe not to have existed (if the Big Bang had been slightly different it is possible for large-scale structures to not have existed). Thus the universe is not something the must necessarily or essentially exists.
  8. Thus a rational person should believe that the universe has a personal explanation.
  9. No personal agent but God could create the entire universe.
  10. A rational person should believe that there is a God.

Distributive Justice

  1. What does it mean to say that distributive justice exists in a society?
  2. Describe how the story of Lazarus and the rich man is a parable of global distributive injustice today.
  3. How does omission play a role in the creation and maintenance of distributive injustice?
  4. Describe three avenues by which individuals can affect distributive justice.
  5. Find an article that points out the gap between rich and poor people in Canada. Write a brief response to the article.
  6. List some types of omissions by privileged people that can cause injustice to flourish for poor people.
  7. Research and compare government spending on military versus the needs of children.

Concern for the Common Good

  1. Define the “common good.” How does it differ from simply the good of the majority?
  2. What service opportunities exist for teenagers in your community? Write a brief description of three of them.
  3. Choose a public policy decision that is being debated in your community: municipal, provincial, federal. Write about how that decision could affect people one hundred years from now.

Seven Key Themes of Social Justice

Write an essay explaining which of the seven key themes of social justice is most important to you and why?